Main pageKEGG pathway → N-Glycan biosynthesis

KEGG pathway: N-Glycan biosynthesis

Pathway hsa00510
Name N-Glycan biosynthesis
Members ALG6 RPN2 STT3A GANAB MGAT1 ALG5 RPN1 ALG3 DAD1 ALG10B DDOST DPM3 MGAT2 DPAGT1 ALG2 MOGS ALG11 ALG8 DPM2 ALG14 ALG1 RFT1 DOLK STT3B ALG10 B4GALT1 ALG12 FDXACB1 MGAT4B DOLPP1 DPM1 ALG13 MAN1C1 MAN1B1 B4GALT3 ST6GAL1 MAN2A1 MGAT4A MGAT5 B4GALT2 FUT8 MAN1A2 MAN2A2 MAN1A1 ST6GAL2 MGAT5B MGAT4C TUSC3 MGAT3
Description N-glycans or asparagine-linked glycans are major constituents of glycoproteins in eukaryotes. N-glycans are covalently attached to asparagine with the consensus sequence of Asn-X-Ser/Thr by an N-glycosidic bond, GlcNAc b1- Asn. Biosynthesis of N-glycans begins on the cytoplasmic face of the ER membrane with the transferase reaction of UDP-GlcNAc and the lipid-like precursor P-Dol (dolichol phosphate) to generate GlcNAc a1- PP-Dol. After sequential addition of monosaccharides by ALG glycosyltransferases [MD:M00055], the N-glycan precursor is attached by the OST (oligosaccharyltransferase) complex to the polypeptide chain that is being synthesized and translocated through the ER membrane. The protein-bound N-glycan precursor is subsequently trimmed, extended, and modified in the ER and Golgi by a complex series of reactions catalyzed by membrane-bound glycosidases and glycosyltransferases. N-glycans thus synthesized are classified into three types: high-mannose type, complex type, and hybrid type. Defects in N-glycan biosynthesis lead to a variety of human diseases known as congenital disorders of glycosylation [DS:H00118 H00119].